Leica Camera Announces New, Premium Accessories from COOPH and Gitzo

by JamesNYCMarch 3. 2017 13:52

March 3, 2017 - Leica Camera presents new accessories for cameras and binoculars.The product portfolio now features Leica Rope Straps, a selection of stylish carrying straps designed by COOPH, as well as an extensive range of high-quality tripods made by Gitzo, the camera equipment specialist from Italy.

In collaboration with COOPH, a manufacturer well known for stylish and practical accessories, Leica now offers a collection of carrying straps for use with selected Leica cameras and binoculars. The Leica Rope Straps are manufactured from the same robust material used in climbing ropes, and feature trim elements made from Italian leather. These straps are durably strong yet elegant accessories that ensure safe and comfortable carrying of cameras or binoculars. They are available in four colors – Fire, Glowing Red, Night and Oasis, in two different lengths (100 and 126 centimeters) and with a choice of metal split ring or nylon connectors.

Also new to the Leica product portfolio is a range of tripods manufactured by Gitzo. These include the GK1545T-82TQD Traveler Kit, comprising a lightweight tripod and ball head. Thanks to its light weight, this travel tripod, which expands to a versatile maximum height, is light enough to carry almost anywhere and features a ball head designed for smooth and precise motion.

 

The range of tripods also includes the Gitzo Mountaineer GT2542 and GT3542L carbon tripods, both of which are distinguished by their versatility and extremely light weight. These two tripod models also include the GH3382QD Precision Ball Head for perfectly accurate movements, and the GC3101 Tripod Bag as a comfortable carrying solution.

 

The GT4543LS Systematic Tripod is also included in the new range of Gitzo products. This particularly stable and extremely versatile tripod is the perfect choice for the demands of professional photographers who shoot with longer focal length lenses.

 

Thanks to their quick, easy and efficient locking systems, the Gitzo GH2720QR and GH1720QR Two-Way Fluid Heads are ideal for the needs of birdwatchers and wildlife photographers alike. Both of these compact, robustly constructed heads offer outstanding stability and maximum precision.

Consumers can visit us.leica-camera.com for more information or visit their local Leica Store, Boutique, or Dealer to purchase any of the new COOPH and Gitzo designed accessories.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

General

Adobe rolls out Lightroom CC and Lightroom 6 with HDR and panorama tools

by JamesNYCApril 21. 2015 12:37

Adobe has announced new standalone and Creative Cloud versions of its image management and Raw conversion software, Lightroom. The latest versions gain simple HDR and Panorama merging tools that create DNG files from the merged results (16-bit floating point DNGs in the case of the HDR mode). Also added is the ability to paint-out regions of gradient filters, to allow more flexible overlays. Face Recognition tools have also been added, to simplify the tagging and retrieval of images.

The CC version of the software is also designed to tie-in with the iOS and Android versions of Lightroom, by allowing for collections you choose to be synced and available across multiple devices, as well as on a web platform. The CC version also works with Voice and Slate: two new programs for creating image-based animations and presentations.

Read more here

Tags: , , , , , , ,

General

LEAF introduces a new 50-megapixel CMOS - Leaf Credo 50

by JamesNYCSeptember 8. 2014 10:24

The Leaf Credo 50, from Mamiya Leaf, is the latest medium-format shooter to feature a 50-megapixel CMOS sensor. As such, the new digital back follows in the footsteps of recently-released devices like the Phase One IQ250, Hasselblad H5D-50c and Pentax 645Z, by boasting a versatile wide ISO range, improved Live View, and faster continuous shooting than its predecessors.

The 50-megapixel medium-format (44 x 33 mm) CMOS sensor at the heart of the Credo 50 is manufactured by Sony, and is understood to be the same one used in a number of rival cameras. In this case it's paired with a new image processor, to offer faster read and write speeds, and help produce highly detailed images with classic Leaf colors, which tend to be more film-like than many other digital cameras.

With an ISO range of 100 to 6,400, the new digital back should be capable of delivering the photographic goods in a variety of lighting conditions. Its 14-bit RAW files also have an expanded dynamic range of 14 stops. Though it's certainly no sports shooter, the Credo 50 is capable of firing off 1.2 frames per second, and its exposures can range from 1/10,000th of a second to an hour.

While the Credo 50 digital back will be available in a number of mounts for use with different camera bodies, its makers would probably rather you use it with a Mamiya/Phase One 645 DF+. On its rear is a 3.2-inch touchscreen display with a 1.15-megapixel resolution. This can be used for improved Live View focus and framing, adjusting settings, as well as inspecting and editing shots.

As full-resolution RAW files can come in at around 50 MB, users might want to stock up on CompactFlash cards if shooting un-tethered. However, if studio-based tethered shooting is more your thing, you'll be pleased to know that the Credo 50 features FireWire 800 and USB 3.0 connectivity, and comes with Capture One software for image capture and editing. Unfortunately though, it lacks the built-in Wi-Fi of the Phase One IQ250.

The Mamiya Leaf Credo 50 digital back will be on show at Photokina 2014, and available later this month for US$27,000 or $31,000 as a system with a 645 DF+ body. There will also be a Wide-Spectrum back option for Near IR and UV imaging.

NEW SENSOR-NEW POSSIBILITIES

The new Leaf Credo 50 is the latest member to the very successful Credo line. It follows the course of delivering legendary image quality and by employing a new high-performance CMOS sensor, it brings high iso capabilities along with fast capture rate, high dynamic range and improved Live View performance.

HIGH RESOLUTION AND HIGH SPEED

The Leaf Credo uses high resolution SONY CMOS sensor with 50 Megapixel, measuring 44mm x 33mm. It can capture at 1.2 frames per second and provides an extended iso range of 100-6400 means more freedom in choosing locations, lighting conditions and capture parameters. For many photographers this means they no longer have to carry another camera for certain type of jobs.

UNCOMPROMISING IMAGE QUALITY

The Leaf Credo 50 delivers the stunning, film-like quality that has been Leaf’s trademark for many years. The new CMOS sensor delivers an unsurpassed 14 f-stops of dynamic range provides unmatched detail, richness of color, low noise and beautiful tonality.

HIGH QUALITY LIVE VIEW

The use of the new CMOS sensor allows for improved Live View image quality with faster refresh rate ald low noise at almost every lighting conditions.

LONG EXPOSURES

The New Leaf Credo 50 digital back can capture virtually noise free images with exposures of up to 1 hour long.

WIDE SPECTURM

The Leaf Credo 50 is available also in Wide-Spectrum version, where the standard IR-cut filter has been replaced with an optically corrected glass. This new back delivers amazingly clean detail in a wider wavelength range due to high NIR sensitivity, high iso capability and excellent long exposures performance. Read more about the WS backs.

CAPTURE ONE SOFTWARE

You are now able to leverage the unique features and workflow environment of Capture One workflow software to optimize and enhance your images, create web galleries and print contact sheets directly from the computer. Together, the Leaf Credo 50 and Capture One are essential tools in producing the results you expect The Leaf Credo 50 offers the best price-performance ratio of any high resolution, high iso single-shot capture device, enabling you to take your photography further by capturing the highest quality, single-shot images possible. The sensor provides the ability to record the finest detail, eliminating the need to use cumbersome multi-shot solutions.

TOTAL CONTROL FROM CAPTURE-TO-DELIVERY

The Leaf Credo 50 lets you shoot anywhere. Featuring a high resolution, touch 3.2” screen, enabling you t o view, inspect and edit your images under all kinds of challenging lighting conditions, both in-studio and outside, as well as offering a wide range of on-screen functions.

CAPTURE SPEEDS AS FAST AS 1.2 FRAMES PER SECOND

Providing the fastest image transfer speed through the use of advanced FireWire 800, USB 3.0 and UDMA CompactFlash technologies, the Leaf Credo 50 is built for speed.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

General

ZEISS - The Physics of Camera Lenses

by JamesNYCAugust 22. 2014 08:23

Zeiss has released a technical article by Dr. Vladan Blahnik all about the irradiance and aperture of camera lenses. The 32-page article goes in-depth on the physics of lenses.

Read it here.

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

General

You Are Not A Storyteller

by JamesNYCAugust 19. 2014 09:06

Finlay someone better able to express what I've been saying for 25 years.

You are not a storyteller - Stefan Sagmeister @ FITC from FITC on Vimeo.

Tags: , , , , , ,

General

David LaChappelle directs music video for Daphne Guinness

by JamesNYCAugust 17. 2014 08:28

SHOWstudio: Evening In Space - Daphne Guinness / David LaChapelle / Tony Visconti from SHOWstudio on Vimeo.

Daphne Guinness consolidates her move into music with a theatrical, mesmerising new music video directed by acclaimed image-maker David LaChapelle. Evening in Space was produced by Tony Visconti and is the first single from Guinness' upcoming debut album, which is billed for release in September 2014. The video features custom fashion by many of Guinness' favourite houses, including Iris van Herpen and Noritaka Tatehana, alongside pieces from her own celebrated clothing collection.

Song Writing and Performance: Daphne Guinness
Music Production: Tony Visconti
Video Direction: David LaChapelle

showstudio.com/project/evening_in_space

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

General

10 Things to Know About Magic Lantern Hack for Canon DSLRs

by JamesNYCAugust 14. 2014 10:46

Our list of the 10 most important things you need to know about Magic Lantern (though not necessarily in order).

1. Audio monitoring

This was the primary reason I first tried Magic Lantern with my Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

No newsflash: it’s critical for filmmakers to be able to monitor audio in real time. How else are you going to know that the wireless lav mics you worked so hard to set right have just gotten a burst of static from a passing truck and you need to reshoot?

Magic Lantern allows you to visually monitor audio levels in real-time. While a whole not-so-cottage industry has arisen from the fact that audio is not Canon's strong suit (Zoom H4n,JuicedLink), it sure makes things much easier, less expensive and less bulky when you can feed an audio signal directly into the camera and know what's actually happening with VU meters.

2. Headphone jack

Even more magical, and another glaring omission on too many Canon DSLR’s: no headphone jack. With Magic Lantern installed, not only can you SEE what’s coming across from your audio source – you can HEAR it, thanks to ML wizardry which can turn either the USB port or the remote port into a headphone jack (NB: you’ll need a special cable like this one to adapt the signal out to a regular pair of headphones like the Bose QuietComfort 15 – or risk damaging the ‘phones).

3. Zebras

Pro cameras have them; the Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7s have them; but most Canons don't. These are a simple set of visual overlays that show you – without having to put on your bifocals or hope your EVF/Screen is properly calibrated – whether you are blowing out your highlights or crushing your blacks.

4. Focus peaking

What was that about bifocals? Even if you have 20/20 vision, achieving critical focus on Canon DSLR’s is notoriously difficult (before I bought an external EVF, I thought it was me – it wasn’t). Focus peaking is another simple visual indicator to help you determine when the thing you want in focus IS in focus. Truly a gift from the Magic Lantern community.

5. Follow focus

A bit of a surprise when I found this: you can use Magic Lantern to set two different focus points and then let the camera move between them – it’s a software driven focus pull. Very cool feature, though not as flexible as a human being doing the actual job. And, it must be said, both the Canon EOS 70D and Canon EOS Rebel SL1 now allow you to do the same thing more easily in production-robust software.

6. RAW Video

Maybe the single most exciting feature of Magic Lantern, this allows a filmmaker to capture the full power of Canon’s sensors – and the difference in image quality, along with the ability to operate on the footage in post – is night and day compared to the H.264 output. Then again, so is the increase in storage required and the workflow necessary to bring RAW footage into an NLE, NOT in RAW’s favor. NB: RAW doesn’t work on all Canon DSLR’s, and is still very much in process.

7. Dual ISO

This is a very clever way of increasing the effective dynamic range of Canon DSLR sensors. The ML community has achieved this by programming the software to identify highlights and shadows – and then to differentially set ISO in those areas (low and high, respectively) to prevent highlights from being blown out or shadows to be crushed. With this written, it is achieved at the expense of resolution in those areas (it’s halved), but the result can be stunning nonetheless.

8. Intervalometer

With Magic Lantern, you don’t need an external remote or intervalometer – it’s built right into the software.

9. Magic Lantern is a Hack

ML is an open source collaboration of truly passionate and brilliant people who wanted to get more from Canon hardware than Canon itself would allow. They’ve done an amazing job.

AND IT’S FREE!

But they are equally clear that they do not – cannot – make any claim to being error-free, nor immune from crashing your entire camera. CAVEAT EMPTOR. I’ve personally experienced successfully loading up ML on one flash card and booting into it, but unsuccessful loading it up on to a second card.

10. These are Things Canon Should Already Have in All of Its DSLRs

Especially with the video-centric Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7s, the marketplace has shifted under Canon’s feet. They may yet rectify this situation at Photokina this fall – but they may not. In the meantime, ML may keep you in the Canon fold for a bit longer.

11. Bonus: If ML Could Prioritize Full Implementation on the Rebel SL1, They Might Have the Beginning of a GH4 Killer – Or At Least Fight it to a Draw (For Now)

I mean to take nothing away from Panasonic’s tremendous accomplishment with the GH4.

And I don’t mean to overstate the case.

But am I the only one who’s looking at the little RebelSL1 and see that it has better autofocus than every Canon body with the exception of the 70D and can take ALL current Canon lenses; has low light sensitivity on a par with – actually slightly better than – the GH4; and weighs just 370g without battery or SD card and 492g with; and that it is thus lighter than the Panasonic GH4 similarly configured at 560g?

Of course, the GH4 has better dynamic range and color depth according to DxOMark – and a little thing called internal 4K recording, stellar EVF and more — but hey, Canon, are you listening? You could do this if you truly wanted to.

In the meantime, as I’ve written before, thank goodness we have Magic Lantern.

 

Tags: , , , ,

General

10 Things to Know About Magic Lantern Hack for Canon DSLRs

by JamesNYCAugust 14. 2014 10:46

Our list of the 10 most important things you need to know about Magic Lantern (though not necessarily in order).

1. Audio monitoring

This was the primary reason I first tried Magic Lantern with my Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

No newsflash: it’s critical for filmmakers to be able to monitor audio in real time. How else are you going to know that the wireless lav mics you worked so hard to set right have just gotten a burst of static from a passing truck and you need to reshoot?

Magic Lantern allows you to visually monitor audio levels in real-time. While a whole not-so-cottage industry has arisen from the fact that audio is not Canon’s strong suit (Zoom H4n, anyone? JuicedLink, perhaps?), it sure makes things much easier, less expensive and less bulky when you can feed an audio signal directly into the camera and know what’s actually happening with VU meters.

2. Headphone jack

Even more magical, and another glaring omission on too many Canon DSLR’s: no headphone jack. With Magic Lantern installed, not only can you SEE what’s coming across from your audio source – you can HEAR it, thanks to ML wizardry which can turn either the USB port or the remote port into a headphone jack (NB: you’ll need a special cable like this one to adapt the signal out to a regular pair of headphones like the Bose QuietComfort 15 – or risk damaging the ‘phones).

3. Zebras

Pro cameras have them; the Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7s have them; but most Canons don’t. These are a simple set of visual overlays that show you – without having to put on your bifocals or hope your EVF/Screen is properly calibrated – whether you are blowing out your highlights or crushing your blacks.

4. Focus peaking

What was that about bifocals? Even if you have 20/20 vision, achieving critical focus on Canon DSLR’s is notoriously difficult (before I bought an external EVF, I thought it was me – it wasn’t). Focus peaking is another simple visual indicator to help you determine when the thing you want in focus IS in focus. Truly a gift from the Magic Lantern community.

5. Follow focus

A bit of a surprise when I found this: you can use Magic Lantern to set two different focus points and then let the camera move between them – it’s a software driven focus pull. Very cool feature, though not as flexible as a human being doing the actual job. And, it must be said, both the Canon EOS 70D and Canon EOS Rebel SL1 now allow you to do the same thing more easily in production-robust software.

6. RAW Video

Maybe the single most exciting feature of Magic Lantern, this allows a filmmaker to capture the full power of Canon’s sensors – and the difference in image quality, along with the ability to operate on the footage in post – is night and day compared to the H.264 output. Then again, so is the increase in storage required and the workflow necessary to bring RAW footage into an NLE, NOT in RAW’s favor. NB: RAW doesn’t work on all Canon DSLR’s, and is still very much in process.

7. Dual ISO

This is a very clever way of increasing the effective dynamic range of Canon DSLR sensors. The ML community has achieved this by programming the software to identify highlights and shadows – and then to differentially set ISO in those areas (low and high, respectively) to prevent highlights from being blown out or shadows to be crushed. With this written, it is achieved at the expense of resolution in those areas (it’s halved), but the result can be stunning nonetheless.

8. Intervalometer

With Magic Lantern, you don’t need an external remote or intervalometer – it’s built right into the software.

9. Magic Lantern is a Hack

ML is an open source collaboration of truly passionate and brilliant people who wanted to get more from Canon hardware than Canon itself would allow. They’ve done an amazing job.

AND IT’S FREE!

But they are equally clear that they do not – cannot – make any claim to being error-free, nor immune from crashing your entire camera. CAVEAT EMPTOR. I’ve personally experienced successfully loading up ML on one flash card and booting into it, but unsuccessful loading it up on to a second card.

10. These are Things Canon Should Already Have in All of Its DSLRs

Especially with the video-centric Panasonic GH4 and Sony A7s, the marketplace has shifted under Canon’s feet. They may yet rectify this situation at Photokina this fall – but they may not. In the meantime, ML may keep you in the Canon fold for a bit longer.

11. Bonus: If ML Could Prioritize Full Implementation on the Rebel SL1, They Might Have the Beginning of a GH4 Killer – Or At Least Fight it to a Draw (For Now)

I mean to take nothing away from Panasonic’s tremendous accomplishment with the GH4.

And I don’t mean to overstate the case.

But am I the only one who’s looking at the little Rebel SL1 and see that it has better autofocus than every Canon body with the exception of the 70D and can take ALL current Canon lenses; has low light sensitivity on a par with – actually slightly better than – the GH4; and weighs just 370g without battery or SD card and 492g with; and that it is thus lighter than the Panasonic GH4 similarly configured at 560g?

Of course, the GH4 has better dynamic range and color depth according to DxOMark – and a little thing called internal 4K recording, stellar EVF and more — but hey, Canon, are you listening? You could do this if you truly wanted to.

In the meantime, as I’ve written before, thank goodness we have Magic Lantern.

Tags: , , , ,

General

Stephen Mallon On Perseverance And Transition To Video

by JamesNYCJuly 1. 2014 09:21

The backstory.
Prior to the incident on the Hudson River, Stephen Mallon was “surviving” on royalties from multiple stock agencies. He had been photographing landscapes for licensing and exhibition, and personal work. A book editor at a portfolio review had expressed interest in making a book but Stephen felt he didnʼt have the right content that he envisioned for his first monograph. So he set about focusing on his interests in the recycling industry. He engaged a writer to help with a proposal, and, explaining that he intended to make images for non-commercial use, he gained access for two days to a recycling plant in New Jersey, which led to access to others in other states and to a body of work that would come to be titled “American Reclamation.” This was all self-funded by the bits and pieces he was drawing in from editorial and resale.

The break.
In New Jersey, in 2008, Stephen spotted a barge loaded full of stripped down subway cars and thus discovered the artificial reef project, wherein these erstwhile MTA cars are shipped to various locations off the US coast and dumped in the ocean to create artificial reefs both for sea-life and for tourism, images of which would become “Next Stop Atlantic.” The company concerned was Weeks Marine, and here began a wonderful relationship. Forward to 2009 and Stephen and his wife are out celebrating her birthday when Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger, III, makes his amazing landing on the freezing Hudson River. Mallon called Weeks Marine and sure enough they were tasked with retrieving the plane; they commissioned Stephen to photograph the project, bringing him in by tug boat to make an incredible photo essay that made national news. As well as all the licensing, the prints are still selling well in the fine art market.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON APHOTOEDITOR.COM

Tags: , , , , , ,

General

Bentley Commercial Shot and Edited with iPhone and iPad

by JamesNYCMay 22. 2014 10:27

Intelligent Details, a short documentary film commissioned by Bentley Motors, introduces Luc Donckerwolke, Director of Design, and SangYup Lee, Head of Exterior Design. Filmed in the Bentley Mulsanne in New York, Intelligent Details focuses on what inspires Luc and SangYup in their roles as design leaders for Bentley Motors. The film highlights the fusion of luxury, performance and technology within the Bentley Mulsanne and reveals the manner in which Intelligent Details was filmed, assembled and edited using the in-car connectivity and entertainment platform.

The new luxury Bentley Mulsane comes with two iPad Airs installed behind the front seats. Further solidifying the link between Apple and Bentley, the car company filmed a 5-minute commercial with the iPhone 5s, and edited it with iMovie on the iPads that are in the back of the car.
"I think it is all about mixing the best products and the best designs together," says the head of design for Bentley.
Watch below (and stay tuned for behind-the-scenes footage starting at the 3:15 mark).

Tags: , , , , , , ,

General

      Copyright 1998-2013 1ProPhoto.Com All rights reserved.