Samsung boosts storage of high-capacity SSDs to a hefty 2 TB

by JamesNYCJune 6. 2015 09:26

Samsung looked to usher in the consumer adoption of solid state drives (SSDs) back in 2013 with the launch of its speedy EVO series. It continues to forge ahead with its high-capacity vision for consumer-oriented, flash memory storage solutions with the addition of a pair of 2TB SSDs to its lineup.

The newest members of Samsung's SSD family are powered by the company's proprietary 3D Vertical NAND (V-NAND) technology, which it first unveiled in 2013. This brings the total range of products in its SSD lineup to 20, ranging in capacity from 120 GB up to the whopping new 2 TB options.

The drives are housed in the same 7 mm, 2.5-in aluminum casing as previous models and comprise 32 layers of 128 GB 3D V-NAND flash chips and an improved MHX controller to better support the 2 TB format. Also inside are four 20 nanometer-class 4Gb LPDDR3 DRAM chips.

Samsung has launched two versions, the 2 TB 850 EVO and 2 TB 850 PRO. The PRO variants have traditionally promised slightly better read/write speeds and reliability. Though Samsung is yet to release technical details on the new drives, it is guaranteeing the PRO model for 10 years or 300 TB written, and the EVO model for five years or 150 TB written.

The 2 TB 850 EVO is expected to cost US$800 and the 2 TB 850 PRO $1,000. There's no official release date yet, but they will be available to buy in 50 countries. Samsung also says that it has plans to extend the 3D V-NAND SSD lineups to include mSATA and M.2 form factors.

 

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SanDisk targets enterprise customers with world's first 4 TB 2.5-inch SSD

by JamesNYCMay 5. 2015 09:22

Flash-based solid state drives (SSDs) have historically been the poor cousins to platter-based HDDs in terms of storage capacity, making them a poorer option for enterprise applications. But SanDisk is looking to change things with its new Optimus MAX SSD, the world's first 2.5-inch Serial Attached SCSI (SAS) SSD packing 4 TB of storage capacity.

Touting the new drive as the first true replacement for legacy mission-critical data center SAS HDDs, SanDisk claims the 4 TB Optimus MAX SSD allows enterprises to maintain their current SAS storage infrastructures, while providing improved, cost-effective performance, and generating less heat and consuming less power than HDDs.

Just exactly how cost effective the new drive is remains to be seen as SanDisk hasn't revealed pricing details, but it is claiming sequential read/write speeds of up to 400/400 MB/s and random read/write speeds of up to 75,000/15,000 Input/Output Operations Per Second (IOPS) for the drive via its SAS 6 Gb/s interface.

Although the thought of slotting a 4 TB SSD into your laptop might sound appealing, SanDisk is targeting the drive at read-intensive applications with typical workloads made up of a read/write ratio of 90/10. This includes data warehousing, media streaming, web servers, video on demand (VOD), and web-based applications.

"Customers have been looking for a way to transition their data centers from HDDs to NAND flash, but have been forced to decide between cost and performance, or give up important functionality," says John Scaramuzzo, Senior Vice President and General Manager, Enterprise Storage Solutions at SanDisk. "We believe that the Optimus MAX will be a disruptive force within the storage industry, catalyzing many organizations to make the switch from their HDD-prominent data center infrastructures to SSDs."

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Samsung 850 Pro 3D NAND and RAM caching result in the fastest, most durable SSD money can buy

by JamesNYCSeptember 3. 2014 06:16

In the world of SSDs, the Samsung 850 Pro is a major achievement. Up until now, all of the advances in SSD technology have come from either shrinking the size of the memory cells through using smaller process nodes, or through packing more data into each cell. For years, that approach won us ever-falling prices and improved performance, but it came with a built-in timer — at each successively smaller process node, it became more and more difficult for manufacturers to ensure NAND would retain its speed and reliability for years.

The alternative to this approach is to adopt 3D NAND, also called V-NAND (Vertical NAND), and stand the entire die stack on its head. The 850 Pro is the first SSD to deploy this method. Samsung has worked on the technology for years. We’ve discussed 3D NAND multiple times before — the basic idea is that by standing the NAND stack on its head and working downwards, it’s possible to build a NAND structure that holds a great deal more data per square millimeter — or at least, that’s the eventual goal.

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Boot Your Mac Pro capture station in seconds with SSDs

by JamesNYCFebruary 11. 2013 03:26

Sonnet's Tempo SSD 6Gb SATA PCIe Cards Now Supported As Boot Drives in Mac Pros

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Hanging onto your Mac Pro for dear life — at least until Apple makes good on its promised 2013 unveiling of a new pro workstation line-up? Sonnet Technologies has one more way for you to turbo-charge that system.
 
Sonnet said this week that its Tempo SSD and Tempo SSD Pro 2.5-inch 6 Gb/sec SATA PCIe SSD cards now support booting in Mac Pros from early 2008 and newer.
 
The Tempo SSD cards allow users to buy standard 2.5-inch SATA SSDs, mount them on the cards, and then use them as boot disks — even in a RAID 0 configuration if they choose. The 6 Gb/sec cards double the bandwidth of the Mac Pro's native 3 Gb/sec SATA bus.
 
How fast is it? Pretty fast. With the Tempo SSD, Sonnet claims sustained read speeds reach up to 500 MB/sec from one SSD, and climb to 660 MB/sec from a set of RAID 0 drives. (Using two SSDs requires that an included bracket be used to extend this half-length card to its full length.) The Tempo SSD Pro, which sports a higher-performance SATA controller, can hit sustained read speeds of up to 960 MB/sec from a set of RAID 0 drives, Sonnet said. Don't try that with spinning disks.
 
The cards can also be used with Macs connected via a Thunderbolt PCIe expansion chassis. They work in Windows 7 and 8, as well, but not in a RAID configuration.
 
The Tempo SSD is $149.95; the Tempo SSD Pro is $299..95. (At those prices, as you can imagine, the SSDs are not included.)

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Improving your digital work flow with Lexar media

by JamesNYCJanuary 9. 2011 11:21

Jeff Cable from Lexar shows us how to use SSD drives and Crucial memory to speed up our computers and increase a photographers digital work flow and save time.

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