David Bailey: “How are you going to cross the road?”

by JamesNYCJuly 12. 2014 05:40

 

Mr. Bailey, would you swear in front of the Queen?

No, if you’re going to accept the Queen you have to accept the tradition. You know, I’ve got nothing against monarchy. I think there are too many hangers-on, but that’s also a cliché thing to say. I doubt she’d be too shocked. She’s been around; she’s not stupid.

You recently took the official photo for her 88th birthday.

Yes and I think she looks incredible for 88. I had never photographed her before.

Why not?

I wouldn’t photograph anybody if they only give you five minutes. I don’t care who it is. I don’t care if God phoned me up and said, “I want a picture, I’ve only got five minutes.” I’d say, “Well, work some of your magic and make it longer!” Even though I’m actually quicker than most and I usually get bored before they get bored.

What kind of people are the most difficult to photograph?

Lots of politicians are so full of themselves. Sports people too a bit. But actors are the most difficult because you never know who you’re photographing. They could be Hamlet or Lassie. But the fewer people they come with, the more interesting they usually are. Johnny Depp came with nobody so I knew it was going to be all right. Jack Nicholson never came with anybody, but Jack’s different because I’ve known him for so long.

 You once said Jack Nicholson is the smartest actor because he knows something nobody else does. What is it that he knows?

I don’t fucking know. If I knew, I’d be as smart as him. (Laughs)

One of the things that fascinated me when I met him was his grin and the sparkle in his eye when he talked about women.

Yeah, with Viagra. He’s the first person that told me about Viagra.

When was that?

Oh, years ago. Before everyone knew about it! (Laughs)

When you know someone very well like you do Jack Nicholson is it easier to take a great portrait of them?

It depends. It’s one of those abstract things. We had a difficult bloke this week, what was he called? Van Morris or somebody… He was so grumpy. But I loved him being grumpy because I could use his grumpiness. I got a great grumpy picture out of him. If I see another picture of a rock ‘n’ roller against some graffiti… It drives you mad, the same old picture! Can’t they ever think of something different to do? So I don’t mind people that are difficult. I quite like that. It amuses me because there is always a way around it. I mean, no one could be more difficult than Van whatever he’s called, Van Morrison.

It seems pointless to have your picture taken if you’re not going to cooperate though.

Well he left really happy, Van Morrison. But it is kind of pointless to come here if you’re not going to help me. They might not like the picture, but one day they will. One day that’s what they’re going to look like – whether they look like that or not. Medici said to Michelangelo, “That sculpture doesn’t look like me.” Michelangelo said, “Listen, you’ll be dead in 20 years, but this will be around for 2,000 years. So, that’s what you look like!” You could say that a bit with photography.

Does it often happen that people aren’t happy with their portrait, but then years later change their mind?

Yeah. 10 years later usually. We had one recently, I won’t mention his name, I shot him 30 years ago and he said, “I hate the picture.” But his wife bought one for him as a birthday present recently. (Laughs) 30 years later and come get the picture.

Are celebrities more difficult nowadays than they were 30 or 40 years ago?

Well, I avoid celebrities. I’m not really interested in people that come with PR. That’s probably why I can’t work in America, because I don’t take all that bullshit. I don’t know how people like Bruce Weber manage, because it would drive me mad. All these silly people who don’t know anything that come with celebrities and try to tell you what to do. It’s madness! They brought it on themselves, the magazines. They should have been stricter. They should have said, “No, we’re not showing you. We’re doing the interview and that’s that.” But instead they pander to them and in the end they end up owning you. Those magazines are owned by the celebrities, really.

You don’t strike me as the type to pander to anyone.

I never really read what people write about me, but the comments people made when doing this exhibition recently at the National Portrait Gallery are so stupid. “Oh, Bailey panders to these people.” I don’t pander to anybody. I just do the picture I do. I don’t care who it is. And I won’t do pictures if people want approval. It has always seemed stupid to me that they ask you to do something and then want to sort of tell you how to do it. What madness!

What about magazines?

In fact, the magazines only get one image. If they don’t like it, then either I say to them, “I have another one,” or else, “Forget it, don’t publish it.”

Does that limit the number of magazines you work with today?

I don’t work for American Vogue anymore, for example. I’m great mates with Anna, I’ve known her for years, but it’s not a question of friendship. It’s just that I don’t do what she wants and she doesn’t do what I want.

Is it impossible for you to collaborate with people that are not exactly on your wavelength?

They’re not even allowed to come on the set when I shoot, not the art director or the stylist or anyone. I’ve always been a bit like that. I remember British Vogue blackmailed photographers in the early days to get them to do what they wanted. They would say, “Well if you don’t sign a contract, you can’t work for us.” And since there was nobody else to work for in England at that moment, you didn’t really have an option. So I’m not very fond of the business people at Condé Nast. I’ve got nothing against the editors and the people that work there, but I think that the business people are less than… modern. (Laughs) I don’t know where they’re coming from! It’s like leftover from a bygone age.

It’s surprising that so much politics are involved in an industry that’s supposed to be so creative.

Well Vogue will destroy itself if it goes on like that because everything that’s run by accountants eventually vanishes up its own ass. The only reason I did fashion in the first place was because I thought, “If I’m going to do photography my way, the only way to be creative and get paid is to do fashion.” So I stopped doing it in the ’80s when I started directing more and more commercials.

How do you pick the people that you take portraits of?

I’m only interested in what I’m interested in.The rest just sort of happened that way. I mean, I knew Mick before he was anybody really, when he was still at the London School of Economics. So that’s another accident in my life, that Mick happened to be a good mate.

You seem to have had all kinds of accidents happen to you. Didn’t Freddie Mercury stick his tongue down your throat during the 1985 Live Aid concert?

Yeah he did. Him and Terry Richardson’s father, they’re the only two men who’ve managed to get their tongues in my mouth! (Laughs)

How many have tried?

Oh, lots. Once I was just in the club and I said, “Who is this old fuck who keeps buying me scotch and sodas?” And they said, “Oh, that’s Francis Bacon.” (Laughs) I didn’t know who Francis Bacon was! But I always took it as a compliment. These silly people that say, “Oh, I was sexually assaulted because somebody grabbed my ass in a gay club.” What are you doing in a gay club?

It’s like going to the pool and complaining that you got wet.

True, if you don’t get your ass grabbed, there’s probably something wrong with you. Take it as an enjoyment! If you don’t like it, don’t go to gay clubs! Fucking idiots. I mean, when I was at school I had teachers try to kiss me all the time, so don’t tell me. It’s all bullshit. If you can’t handle that, then how are you going to get through the rest of life? How are you going to cross the road?

Have you always had a bit of a temper?

Well, that’s a funny story… During the war we got bombed and our flat was so destroyed that we had to move to the countryside. One time two boys said to me, “Would you like a blackberry?” and I said, “Yeah.” So they gave me a blackberry. And they said, “Do you want another one?” I said, “Yeah, it was nice.” And they gave me another one and said, “Did you like that?” I said, “Yes.” And they said, “Well, we peed on those.” So when they had gone I set fire to their fucking field. (Laughs)

How old were you?

About five. Five and a half maybe.

 

 VIA THE TALK

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Drone lighting - MIT Researchers Develop a Drone that Can Automatically Light Your Subjects for You

by JamesNYCJuly 11. 2014 03:32

Autonomous vehicles could automatically assume the right positions for photographic lighting. - Video Below -

In yet another way of feeding on the insecurities of amateure photographers in order to separate them from their money,...
a group of researchers from MIT and Cornell University want your next lighting rig to be autonomous and airborne. On display this August at the Symposium on Computational Aesthetics in Graphics, Visualization and Imaging, they've actually developed a drone that automatically and dynamically lights a subject (living or otherwise) for a photographer while he or she focuses on getting the shot.

Announced earlier today through the MIT News website, the prototype the researchers have ready for demonstration focuses on providing perfect rim lighting and a proof of concept using a difficult to produce effect.

Using a continuous light source, a flash and a laser rangefinder, the flying assistant sets itself up based on the position of the subject as well as what the photographer is seeing through the camera, making sure the lighting is always "picture perfect", if you will.

Using the system is extremely straight-forward. First, the photographer tells the drone what side they want the rim light to come from. Then, once the little helicopter is in position, the photographer indicates in the desired rim width they want by typing in a percentage of the current width.

From that moment on, the drone will handle everything else automatically. If the subject moves and the rim width changes, the drone will move. If the photographer moves, the drone uses a 20-images-per-second feed from the photographers camera to adjust its position accordingly.

No moving lights back and forth, the lights move for you.

The long term goal here is to allow photographers to use a whole fleet of drones in their work, never having to set up another light again. Just indicate the desired effect, and your little Sky Net lighting system gets to work creating that effect and then maintaining it automatically until you move on to the next setup.

And while that autonomous lighting future is still a ways away, Ravi Ramamoorthi, a professor of computer science and engineering at the University of California, San Diego, tells MIT that he believes the system is definitely doable given the rapid advance of the necessary technologies.

 

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Hell, there are no rules here

by JamesNYCJuly 5. 2014 15:36

"Hell, there are no rules here - we're trying to accomplish something." - Thomas A. Edison

that says it all

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Photographer Creates Free iPhone App for His Signature Style

by JamesNYCJuly 2. 2014 04:52

Photographer John Hornbeck couldn't find a camera app for his phone that came anywhere close to the high-contrast, black-and-white photographs he makes with his camera, and he wasn't interested in "having to purchase a bunch of add-ons." Hornbeck, who earns money from his photography but also works in the software industry, decided to collaborate with a friend to build an app that would come close to reproducing his style.

After they finished the app, Contrast by Hornbeck, the photographer used it for a few months before he and the developer decided to “push it out to the public and see if there would be any interest from others.” There has been.

Hornbeck has promoted the app—it’s available for free—via his social media channels, and others have shared it. “I know at least a couple of respected photographers who use it and have told others about it, so it’s just word of mouth and people playing around,” he says. The downloads number “in the thousands,” and several hundred images on Instagram are tagged with the #contrast by hornbeck hashtag.

The biggest thing this app offers that others don’t, Hornbeck says, is simplicity. Photographers can use it to make high-contrast, black-and-white shots. “That’s all it does and we have no plans to really change that.”

 

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Stephen Mallon On Perseverance And Transition To Video

by JamesNYCJuly 1. 2014 09:21

The backstory.
Prior to the incident on the Hudson River, Stephen Mallon was “surviving” on royalties from multiple stock agencies. He had been photographing landscapes for licensing and exhibition, and personal work. A book editor at a portfolio review had expressed interest in making a book but Stephen felt he didnʼt have the right content that he envisioned for his first monograph. So he set about focusing on his interests in the recycling industry. He engaged a writer to help with a proposal, and, explaining that he intended to make images for non-commercial use, he gained access for two days to a recycling plant in New Jersey, which led to access to others in other states and to a body of work that would come to be titled “American Reclamation.” This was all self-funded by the bits and pieces he was drawing in from editorial and resale.

The break.
In New Jersey, in 2008, Stephen spotted a barge loaded full of stripped down subway cars and thus discovered the artificial reef project, wherein these erstwhile MTA cars are shipped to various locations off the US coast and dumped in the ocean to create artificial reefs both for sea-life and for tourism, images of which would become “Next Stop Atlantic.” The company concerned was Weeks Marine, and here began a wonderful relationship. Forward to 2009 and Stephen and his wife are out celebrating her birthday when Chesley Burnett “Sully” Sullenberger, III, makes his amazing landing on the freezing Hudson River. Mallon called Weeks Marine and sure enough they were tasked with retrieving the plane; they commissioned Stephen to photograph the project, bringing him in by tug boat to make an incredible photo essay that made national news. As well as all the licensing, the prints are still selling well in the fine art market.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE ON APHOTOEDITOR.COM

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Nikon D810 vs Canon 5D Mark III

by JamesNYCJuly 1. 2014 05:10

Nikon D810 vs Canon 5D Mark III Video Test

Lenses used :- Nikkor 24-70 2.8 Canon 24-70 2.8
Note :- No editing is done. Both Camera are set on Same ISO-Aperture-Shutter Speed - Standard Style & Used same quality of Lenses . * No Atomos Ninja -2 or Atomos Samurai or Blade or No any other External Video Recorder are used. Its All In camera Video Footages.

 

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Apple To Cease Development Of Aperture And Transition Users To Photos For OS X

by JamesNYCJune 27. 2014 08:48

For those looking to switch from Aperture To Lightroom Adobe provides this PDF.

 

With the release of OS X Yosemite later this year, Apple will cease the development of its ‘pro’ photo editing app Aperture. Users of that program will be transitioned to Photos, a new app that was introduced during the WWDC keynote and that will be released next year.

Photos integrates many of the advanced photo editing features that were previously found in Aperture and will replace iPhoto on the new OS X as well.

With the introduction of the new Photos app and iCloud Photo Library, enabling you to safely store all of your photos in iCloud and access them from anywhere, there will be no new development of Aperture,” an Apple spokesperson told TechCrunch. “When Photos for OS X ships next year, users will be able to migrate their existing Aperture libraries to Photos for OS X.”

Apple says that it will provide compatibility updates to Aperture that allow it to run on OS X Yosemite, but will not continue to develop it. Adobe says that it will ‘double down’ on Lightroom support and offer Apple users a way to migrate: Put simply we’re doubling down on our investments in Lightroom and the new Creative Cloud Photography plan and you can expect to see a rich roadmap of rapid innovation for desktop, web and device workflows in the coming weeks, months and years. We also continue to invest actively on the iOS and OSX platforms, and are committed to helping interested iPhoto and Aperture customers migrate to our rich solution across desktop, device and web workflows.

Here's a new image of Photos on OS X Yosemite:

Apple will also provide update paths that help users transition from Aperture and iPhoto to Photos for OS X. This does not, Apple says, signal a move away from servicing pro customers with other apps like Final Cut Pro and Logic, which will stick around.

As a long-time Lightroom user and ex pro photographer, this news doesn’t surprise me in the least. Lightroom did a killer job of siphoning Aperture customers, especially as Aperture endured long periods of languishing without a lot of major updates. Now, Apple is formalizing that shift by unifying its photos apps into one offering. And Photos, unlike Aperture, integrates Apple’s new iCloud Photo Library, which should make things easier for people with multiple Apple devices.

I would also not be surprised if Apple discontinued iPhoto on iOS in favor of one photos app there, as iOS 8 will introduce new editing tools to the stock app. But I have no information on whether that will happen or not; it’s just a hunch.

 

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DaVinci Resolve 11 and Resolve 11 Lite Rleased by BlackMagic today

by JamesNYCJune 27. 2014 02:55

BlackMagic’s DaVinci Resolve has for along time been the industry leader in color grading software for movie industry professionals. When the company released the free version of Resolve lite several years ago movie makers around the country began to take notice, and began using it on independent or  low-budget projects; from music videos to feature documentaries.

What’s New

The release of DaVinci Resolve 11 beta, now delivers a full featured non-linear editing system (NLE) to manage everything from media management through editing and grading through finishing, all in one powerful, high-end system.

Editing in Resolve 11

For those movie makers whose NLE loyalty remains with Adobe Premiere Pro or Apple’s Final Cut Pro X, Resolve 11 brings improved round trip collaboration features. These allow indie directors cutting their movies in PPro and FCP X to easily move their edit to a post-production company for final color grading and finishing. Perfect when independent documentaries and features find backing for mainstream release.

Color Grading in Resolve 11

BlackMagic DaVinci Resolve 11 Enhancements

Resolve 11′s improved collaboration workflow tools enable editors and colorists to work on different workstations simultaneously while sharing the same timeline. This allows feature film and television creative teams to work faster and in sync.

BlackMagic has also improved DaVinci Resolve 11′s color correction tools. Its new color grading and RAW image controls will be especially welcomed by stills photographers who are in the process of becoming digital cinematographers and directors.

This new version includes controls already familiar to RAW photo processing software users - highlight and shadow recovery, mid-tone detail enhancement, color boost, saturation, lift, gain and contrast. Some hybrid stills/video photographers have reportedly been using Resolve Lite for stills images. This new version should tempt many more to do that and apply it to their video footage too.

DaVinci Resolve 11 has now also become an on-set asset management tool through secure backup and saving of your digital camera files via its new clone tool. The tool copies memory cards, media drives and camera packs to multiple back up drives at the same time. Clone backups can be done with DaVinci Resolve Lite 11 on your Mac Book Pro or Windows laptop or through DaVinci Resolve 11 full version in your video village.

These enhancements are just the tip of the iceberg. For more information go to the BlackMagic Design DaVinci Resolve pages. If you are new to DaVinci Resolve, it's a good idea to get a feel for things by trying out the full version by downloading DaVinci Resolve 11 Lite.

Compare the features of DaVinci Resolve

Learn more about DaVinci Resolve 11

Learn more about DaVinci Resolve 11.0 Beta

Learn more about DaVinci Resolve Lite 11.0 Beta

Compare DaVinci Resolve 11 Beta with DaVinci Resolve Lite 11 Beta

DaVinci Resolve 11 Configuration Guide

DaVinci Resolve 11 Manual

DaVinci Resolve Keyboard Shortcuts

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Behind the Scenes of OK Go’s Viral Optical Illusion-Packed Single Take Music Video

by JamesNYCJune 24. 2014 03:13

Go‘s recent music video for the song “The Writing’s On the Wall” was a huge hit, receiving over 7.6M views on YouTube.While it was shot in a single take, doesn’t mean it only took just one take to get it right. The end result is the best of 50 tries and 3 weeks worth of rehearsals.

OK Go - The Writing's On the Wall - Official Video

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Dior Addict – Director’s Cut

by JamesNYCJune 11. 2014 15:58

Dior recruited director Harmony Korine (Spring Breakers) for its latest perfume spot, featuring Russian model Sasha Luss in a through-the-looking-glass scenario set to a Die Antwoord soundtrack.

More here

Dior Addict Fragrance - Making-of

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